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January 2015 Biblical Studies Carnival

First-time Carnival host Vincent Artale has posted the latest collection of biblical-scholarly goodness for your reading pleasure. Well done, sir!

Ten Tips for Reading the Bible for the First Time

Courtesy of Patton Dodd.

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg is known for making aggressive New Year’s Resolutions, and apparently keeping them. For 2015, he plans to become a bookworm, reading a book every other week. His plan may include the Bible:

My challenge for 2015 is to read a new book every other week — with an emphasis on learning about different cultures, beliefs, histories and technologies. . . . Rachel Brown, Bill Munns, Marlo Kanipe and others suggested I read the Bible.

Maybe the Bible won’t make the cut — it’s pretty tough to read it in two weeks even when you aren’t running one of the nation’s largest companies — but it definitely fits the bill for “learning about different cultures, beliefs, histories. . . .” So as as thanks (/punishment) for founding Facebook, I’d like to offer him — and any other new Bible readers out there — some Bible-reading tips.

December 2014 Biblical Studies Carnival

Posted for your reading pleasure at Jim West’s blog. It’s super duper.

I Am the Very Model of a Biblical Philologist


(H/T: Jim West)

November 2014 Biblical Studies Carnival

Posted for your reading pleasure at Jim West’s blog.

Reading the Bible Critically in the Church

Peter Enns took part in a panel discussion on the topic of “Reading the Bible in the 21st Century” at the Society of Biblical Literature meeting last week in San Diego. His ten-minute opening remarks are well worth your time. Here is his conclusion:

If I can put this in Christian terms, scripture bears witness to the acts of God and most supremely to the act of God in Christ. But scripture bears witness in culturally and contextually meaningful ways. This is where historical criticism comes into the picture—not as an enemy to be guarded against or plundered, and not as an awkward relative you don’t know what to do with, but as a companion, a means of understanding and embracing the complex actualizing dynamic of the Bible as a whole.

This is what I am aiming for in The Bible Tells Me So, albeit at a popular level, because that is where this discussion needs to be—with those who feel they have to chose between accepting academic insights or maintaining faith. I don’t believe that is a choice that has to be made, and miss out on a lot when we feel we need to.

Hengel: Luke the Historian

Tim Henderson has posted his summary of “Luke the Historian” from Martin Hengel’s Between Jesus and Paul.

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