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November 2014 Biblical Studies Carnival

Posted for your reading pleasure at Jim West’s blog.

Reading the Bible Critically in the Church

Peter Enns took part in a panel discussion on the topic of “Reading the Bible in the 21st Century” at the Society of Biblical Literature meeting last week in San Diego. His ten-minute opening remarks are well worth your time. Here is his conclusion:

If I can put this in Christian terms, scripture bears witness to the acts of God and most supremely to the act of God in Christ. But scripture bears witness in culturally and contextually meaningful ways. This is where historical criticism comes into the picture—not as an enemy to be guarded against or plundered, and not as an awkward relative you don’t know what to do with, but as a companion, a means of understanding and embracing the complex actualizing dynamic of the Bible as a whole.

This is what I am aiming for in The Bible Tells Me So, albeit at a popular level, because that is where this discussion needs to be—with those who feel they have to chose between accepting academic insights or maintaining faith. I don’t believe that is a choice that has to be made, and miss out on a lot when we feel we need to.

Hengel: Luke the Historian

Tim Henderson has posted his summary of “Luke the Historian” from Martin Hengel’s Between Jesus and Paul.

Hengel: Hymns and Christology

Tim Henderson has now posted his summary of Martin Hengel’s essay, “Hymns and Christology.”

October 2014 Biblical Studies Carnival

…is now posted at Brian Renshaw’s eponymous blog.

Henderson on Hengel on Paul on Christos

Tim Henderson has posted his summary of the next essay in Martin Hengel’s Between Jesus and Paul: “‘Christos’ in Paul.”

Don’t Get Caught Between Two Mountainous Rabbis

I found this story quite fascinating, as is almost always the case when ancient rabbinic disputes are about to get real:

Clearly, what concerns the rabbis when it comes to factionalism is the possibility of Jews disagreeing about the Law in public. No wonder even the greatest sages hesitated to get involved in disputes between the two schools. “They asked Rabbi Yehoshua: What is the law with regard to the rival wife of a daughter? He said to them: It is a matter of dispute between Beit Shammai and Beit Hillel.” But this evasive answer wasn’t enough to satisfy the questioners, who pressed him: “And in accordance with whose statement is the law? He said to them: Why are you inserting my head between two great mountains?” Getting caught between Hillel and Shammai was like being caught in a war between mountains—or, as we might say, between rock and a hard place. No wonder it took a divine voice to settle the argument between them.

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