Dr. Platypus

Category Archives: Bible

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August 2018 Biblical Studies Carnival

The Monday Morning Theologian has the honors this month. Enjoy!

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June Biblical Studies Carnival

Have I really missed posting that many? Sorry about that. Here’s the June Carnival, hosted by Reading Acts.

February 2018 Biblical Studies Carnival

Jacob J. Prahlow hosts this month’s Biblical Studies Carnival at his Pursuing Veritas blog. Enjoy!

November 2017 Biblical Studies Carnival

Posted for your reading pleasure by Jim West at his Zwinglius Redivivus blog.

October 2017 Biblical Studies Carnival

Doug Chaplin has the hosting honors this month. Go visit his blog and see what’s worth reading about in biblical studies!

August 2017 Biblical Studies Carnival

Posted at Eis Doxan. Enjoy!

The “New and Improved” Perspective on Paul?

Scot McKnight is working through Stephen Chester’s Reading Paul with the Reformers at his JesusCreed blog. (Here’s part 1; here’s part 2.) In today’s blog post, he interacts in some detail with a passage from Chester that takes issue with the New Perspective’s assertion that the Reformers missed Paul’s point about justification by faith. I’m not sure that all NP supporters would agree that the Reformers were wrong so much as they placed the emphasis in the wrong place, but others are certainly deeper into this debate than I am. McKnight summarizes Chester’s questions thusly:

Chester begins with Luther and Erasmus and more importantly uses them for the hermeneutical dichotomy they created: Should we do “theological interpretation” (Luther) or historical critical work (Erasmus), and is the Bible clear in all it says (Luther) but difficult at times (Erasmus), and does the ambiguity of Scripture create problems (Erasmus) or is it a false approach (Luther)?

Chester elaborates on several key points of disagreement between Luther and Erasmus on the proper interpretation of Scripture. This leads, ultimately, to a threefold criterion for discerning the best interpretations, namely:

The conflict of interpretations is thus best addressed by a mixed hermeneutic. The goal of hearing the Spirit speak through Paul in his texts is served by applying the triple criteria of

historical plausibility,
canonical consistency,
and contemporary theological fruitfulness.

McKnight suggests Chester is “doing the newer new perspective, one that appreciates too the Reformers’ reading of Paul.”